Oh no, our event was cancelled! What now?

After having to postpone an in-person learning event that was meant to bring members from across the whole Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance together we brought our knowledge sharing online. This blog summarises our key learning and recommendations if you’re forced to do the same.

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Oh no, our event was cancelled! What now?

What did we learn from Cyclone Idai?

March 15 marks the first anniversary of Cyclone Idai’s devastating charge through Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Mozambique (which was hit again a month later by Cyclone Kenneth, the strongest cyclone to ever hit the country). Cyclone Idai, which brought with it devastating winds, floods and landslides, was the world’s largest humanitarian disaster in 2019. More than 1,350 people lost their lives and over 3 million were affected, many of whom are still feeling the effects a whole year later.

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What did we learn from Cyclone Idai?

Learning about trees: How can nature solve urban challenges?

The Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance promotes alternative ways to reduce flood risks and build communities’ resilience. Nature-based solutions are one of the most promising approaches to achieve these goals, thanks to the multiple co-benefits they can offer. Still these interventions are relatively uncommon, especially in cities.

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Learning about trees: How can nature solve urban challenges?

How can participatory monitoring help us better understand rainfall?

When trying to adapt and live with largely unpredictable natural phenomena and hazards, having clear, reliable, and timely information makes for a better prepared community. But what is our role as citizens in generating this information? In this blog you will learn how community members in the Rímac River Basin, near Lima, Peru, collaborate with national authorities to generate more complete and detailed information on precipitation.

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How can participatory monitoring help us better understand rainfall?

Flood risk is rising and so must our resilience to it

The severe flooding over the last two weeks in parts of Wales and England which destroyed homes, businesses and livelihoods provides further evidence that flood risk is rising, but not along with our ability to mitigate it. And in West Yorkshire, the failed attempt to install temporary barriers in place of a £30m flood defence under construction subjected the town of Mytholmroyd to a severe deluge, making it clear that a wider flood resilience strategy is urgently needed.

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Flood risk is rising and so must our resilience to it
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